The much buttressed Kinbuck Bridge

From its source in the Ochils, the 22-mile long Allan Water flows through Dunblane to join the River Forth just south of Bridge of Allan. I had previously walked downstream from Dunblane with Rhona, following the Darn Road, an ancient trackway thought to have been used by the Romans that links Dunblane and Bridge of…

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The Craggy Summit Of Creag Each

Overlooking Loch Earn, 672m/2205ft Creag Each, hill of the horse, lies north-west of St Fillans from where it is well-seen. It is a Graham, one of over 200 hills in Scotland with a height of between 2000 and 2499ft and with a drop of at least 150m on all sides. With 4½ miles to walk…

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Bo`ness Railway Station

At odds with the weather forecast, it was one of those black and white days on a visit to Bo`ness, which, as every schoolboy should know, is a shortened version of Borrowstounness, the Burgh Town on the Ness, the nose of land jutting into the Forth. The overnight fall of snow, allied to the low…

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Union Of South Africa Steam train

The long debated Borders Railway from Waverley station to the “current” terminus at Tweedbank, at 30 miles the longest new domestic railway to be built in Britain for more than a century, was opened to passengers on 6th September 2015. Courtesy of the Mountain Maid and Hare celebrating a couple of biggish birthdays, on 1st…

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The Kelpies

Opened in 1790, the Forth & Clyde Canal became the main highway across Scotland; a route enhanced by the Charlotte Dundas, the world`s first practical steamboat, and later with the 1822 connection at Falkirk of the Union Canal from Edinburgh.     The 35m/115ft higher Union Canal has now been extended one mile further west…

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Jimbo dogs and the mighty Cuillin

Traversing the area between the Black and Red Cuillin, a walk from Loch Coruisk to Sligachan via upper Srath na Creitheach and Glen Sligachan, offers a panoramic view, superior to that from Glen Brittle, of the east facing horseshoe curve of the Black Cuillin. Margaret, Rhona, Jimbo (plus two Springer spaniels) and I reached Loch…

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Looking At The Seals

Hoping for drier weather, a few weeks ago Jimbo and I went to Tentsmuir. Notice boards passed on the walk indicate that the area was so named following the shipwrecking of a Danish fleet in the 1780s when some of the sailors settled there, living in tents on the moor. This is also referred to…

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A Lovely Beech Tree Avenue

Jimbo, Rhona and I had intended to go to the high tops, but with widespread low cloud forecast there was a last-minute change of plan. Jimbo`s brother, John, a resident of Aberfeldy, had mentioned the new-for-us 8-mile Aberfeldy to Kenmore Riverside Walk; a well-signposted though unmapped route which follows the northern banks of the River…

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Torwood Iron Age Broch

Ideas for walks come from a variety of sources…previous knowledge, suggestions from friends, news items scanned from the press or, in this case, by chance encounter. Travelling back home on the London train I found myself sitting beside Hazel and Ian Greenhalgh and their daughter. We got talking such that the journey seemed to take…

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The Crinan Canal

Described as Britain`s most captivating short cut, the Crinan Canal is the 9-mile waterway that links the western sea with central Scotland….from Crinan to Ardrishaig….thus avoiding the oft treacherous journey round the Mull of Kintyre. Look out for old puffers that once steamed through the canal….think of Para Handy, the crafty skipper of the Vital…

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